SUBTLE INSECT BLOG.

My name is josh and I'm a amateur entomologist. I've been collecting insects since i was ten years old and don't plan on stopping. If your have any questions ask me, and if you ever want to meet up and collect bugs hell yeah. I live in Idaho currently and my Snapchat is: skymoose :) feel free to say hi!
libutron:

Turquoise Longhorn - Prosopocera lactator
Prosopocera lactator (Coleoptera - Cerambycidae) is an African species of longhorn beetle, displaying elytral scale patterns with greenish-white patches surrounded by light-brown regions.
The greenish-white regions of this beetle are constituted by diminute scales formed by three-dimensional photonic-crystal grains described as a face-centered-cubic array of spheres, connected by short rods, reminiscent of the “ball-and-stick” models used by solid-state chemists to visualize atomic structures.
This type of three-dimensional photonic crystals have been discovered in butterflies and in Coleoptera such as weevils. These well-ordered microstructures are expected to produce iridescence, sometimes with metallic colorations. However, against expectations, in the Turquoise Longhorn this very ordered local structure only produces a desaturated greenish-white coloration, without iridescence.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Bernard Dupont (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) | Locality: Punda Maria Camp, Kruger NP, Limpopo, South Africa (2013)

libutron:

Turquoise Longhorn - Prosopocera lactator

Prosopocera lactator (Coleoptera - Cerambycidae) is an African species of longhorn beetle, displaying elytral scale patterns with greenish-white patches surrounded by light-brown regions.

The greenish-white regions of this beetle are constituted by diminute scales formed by three-dimensional photonic-crystal grains described as a face-centered-cubic array of spheres, connected by short rods, reminiscent of the “ball-and-stick” models used by solid-state chemists to visualize atomic structures.

This type of three-dimensional photonic crystals have been discovered in butterflies and in Coleoptera such as weevils. These well-ordered microstructures are expected to produce iridescence, sometimes with metallic colorations. However, against expectations, in the Turquoise Longhorn this very ordered local structure only produces a desaturated greenish-white coloration, without iridescence.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Bernard Dupont (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) | Locality: Punda Maria Camp, Kruger NP, Limpopo, South Africa (2013)

(via vita-insectum)

bluereverie:

More pinned insects at the Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium in New Orleans.

(via dick-squeeze)

libutron:

Rainbow Metalmark - Caria trochilus 
Belonging to a genus that contains some of the most beautiful and elusive species, Caria trochilus (Riodinidae) is one of the 9 species of Caria that can be found in Amazonia and the foothills of the eastern Andes. These butterflies have an almost black ground color and metallic blue scales, and have a rapid and erratic flight. 
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Pablo MDS | Locality: Peru (2012)

libutron:

Rainbow Metalmark - Caria trochilus 

Belonging to a genus that contains some of the most beautiful and elusive species, Caria trochilus (Riodinidae) is one of the 9 species of Caria that can be found in Amazonia and the foothills of the eastern Andes. These butterflies have an almost black ground color and metallic blue scales, and have a rapid and erratic flight. 

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Pablo MDS | Locality: Peru (2012)

(via yourdailybug)

moonfall-requiem:

This amazing creature is a bilateral gynandromorph Muslin Moth (Diaphora mendica), which was caught at Sandwich Bay Bird Observatory (www.sbbot.org.uk), Kent, on 9 May 2014. The left side of its body is male, the right side female. Muslin Moth is a sexually dimorphic species (i.e. males and females have different appearances) with male moths dark grey and females white. You can even see that the antennae are different, with the more feathered antenna of the male on the left side. Gynandromorphs occur in many insects, crustaceans and other animals, usually as a result of a cell division error in early development. However, unless the males and females in that species look different (as in the Muslin Moth) such gynandromorphs are difficult to spot. (Image: Sandwich Bay Bird Observatory - Richard Fox, Surveys Manager)

moonfall-requiem:

This amazing creature is a bilateral gynandromorph Muslin Moth (Diaphora mendica), which was caught at Sandwich Bay Bird Observatory (www.sbbot.org.uk), Kent, on 9 May 2014. The left side of its body is male, the right side female. Muslin Moth is a sexually dimorphic species (i.e. males and females have different appearances) with male moths dark grey and females white. You can even see that the antennae are different, with the more feathered antenna of the male on the left side.

Gynandromorphs occur in many insects, crustaceans and other animals, usually as a result of a cell division error in early development. However, unless the males and females in that species look different (as in the Muslin Moth) such gynandromorphs are difficult to spot.

(Image: Sandwich Bay Bird Observatory - Richard Fox, Surveys Manager)

(via yourdailybug)