SUBTLE INSECT BLOG.

My name is josh and I'm a amateur entomologist. I've been collecting insects since i was ten years old and don't plan on stopping. If your have any questions ask me, and if you ever want to meet up and collect bugs hell yeah. I live in Idaho currently and my Snapchat is: skymoose :) feel free to say hi!

chrysallidem:

The Scorpionfly (Panorpa communis) may look like the offspring of a scorpion and a wasp, but they are in fact completely harmless, living off dead insects that they sometimes take from spiderwebs. What looks like a stinger is actually the male’s genitals.

Scorpionflies have been around since the Mesozoic age (250-66 million years ago) and are believed to be the forerunners of most modern moths and butterflies.

Classification: Animalia - Arthropoda - Insecta - Mecoptera - Panorpidae - Panorpa

Image credits: 1, 2, 3.

libutron:

Broad-bordered Bee Hawkmoth
This beautiful furry moth is named Hemaris fuciformis (Sphingidae), a day-flying species that inhabits clearings, forest edges, forest gap systems and shrub-reach areas in grasslands and slopes.
The distribution of the species extends from Northwest Africa across most of Europe until well into Asia.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Steve Covey | Locality: Captive bred (UK)

libutron:

Broad-bordered Bee Hawkmoth

This beautiful furry moth is named Hemaris fuciformis (Sphingidae), a day-flying species that inhabits clearings, forest edges, forest gap systems and shrub-reach areas in grasslands and slopes.

The distribution of the species extends from Northwest Africa across most of Europe until well into Asia.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Steve Covey | Locality: Captive bred (UK)

agriculturalmadness:

Meet Creatonotos gangis, the weirdest moth you’ve ever seen. This is a male, and the strange structures you can see are called corematas. They’re used to spread large amounts of pheromones which attract females. The size of these scent organs are dependent on the diet that the moth experienced as a caterpillar.
Photograph by Juan Manuel

agriculturalmadness:

Meet Creatonotos gangis, the weirdest moth you’ve ever seen. This is a male, and the strange structures you can see are called corematas. They’re used to spread large amounts of pheromones which attract females. The size of these scent organs are dependent on the diet that the moth experienced as a caterpillar.

Photograph by Juan Manuel

(via delanik)

growthemedicine:

I encountered this little dude high-up on the mountain yesterday. What a rush! I’d never seen anything like this before and happily marvelled at his exquisite form and colour and he gently stomped over my hand.

(via delanik)

Going blacklighting for bugs tonight till late. C ya la8ter suckas

—Me

299792458c:

Prionus laticollis, the broadnecked root borer. Excluding its antennae, it measures about 3.5 cm long. 

299792458c:

Prionus laticollis, the broadnecked root borer. Excluding its antennae, it measures about 3.5 cm long. 

(via queuequeuekachoo)

cool-critters:

Glasswinged butterfly (Greta oto)

The Glasswinged butterfly is a brush-footed butterfly. Adults range from Mexico through Panama and Colombia. They also fly through Florida. Long migrations are a common behavior of this species. Adults are assumed to be toxic, but their toxicity results mainly from males feeding on flowers (e.g., Asteraceae) whose nectar contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids. These same alkaloids also are converted into pheromones by the males and used to attract females.

photo credits: David Tiller, relativedeprivation on Reddit

(via queuequeuekachoo)